Tuesday, October 17, 2017

My "Arlene" Crochet Block



This design is one that I came up with as I was crocheting the Vibrant Vintage CAL designed by Rachele Carmona. The pattern is available on Ravelry and there is a group devoted to the project.  As Rachele Carmona named each of her designed squares after friends, I did the same with this one.

Arlene
By: Anne Goodwin

SC – Single Crochet
HDC – Half Double Crochet
DC – Double Crochet

Special Stitches: 

Beg DC: = (SC + SC through back of second loop of just-made SC)

Beg TC: = (SC + SC through back of second loop of just-made SC + another SC through back of second loop of second SC

Beg 2 DC Cluster - Beg DC and DC in same stitch.

Beg 2TC Cluster – Beg TC and TC in same stitch.

Note: Beg DC and Beg TC does not count as stitch. When joining, join with slip stitch in TC, skipping over Beg TC.

2TC Cluster – (YO twice, insert hook in magic circle, YO, pull through 2 loops, YO, pull through 2 loops; then repeat all of that and draw through all 3 loops on hook.

2DC Cluster – (YO, insert hook in stitch, YO, pull up loop, YO, drawn yarn through 2 loops on hook) twice, YO and draw yarn through all 3 loops on hook.

Popcorn – 4 DC in indicated spot, release loop from hook in first DC, pull loop to front, closing popcorn.

Foundation: Ch-5 and join in first Ch to make ring OR, use magic loop.

Round 1: All in ring, Beg 2TC Cluster, ch 2; **( 2 2TC Clusters, ch 2) 3 times, 1 2TC Cluster, join at top of first 2TC Cluster with slip stitch. _8_2TC Clusters, 4 ch-2 space total_ [8 stitches + 4 spaces]

Round 2: Slip stitch into first stitch and into chain 2 space, chain 6, DC into next stitch, ch 1, DC, ch 1; **slip stitch into next ch 2 space, chain 6, DC, ch 1, DC, ch 1** 3 times, join by slip stitching into the first 3 loops of the chain 6 loop. _4_ch-6 spaces, 8 DC, 8 ch-1 spaces_ [8] [2 stitches + 3 spaces per side]

Round 3: Beg 2DC Cluster, chain 2, 3 2DC Clusters all into Chain 6 space (start of first corner); **SC into 1st DC stitch, chain 2, 4 DC in chain 1 space, chain 2, SC in DC stitch, slip stitch into the next chain 1 space, make corner (3 2DC Cluster, chain 2, 3 2DC Cluster)** 3 times, 2 2DC Clusters to complete first corner, join with a slip stitch to top of Beg 2DC Cluster. _24 2DC Clusters, 16 DC, 8 SC, 8 ch-2 spaces, 4 ch-1 space_ [48] [12 stitches + 3 spaces per side]

Round 4: Slip stitch into the next DC stitch (first stitch before corner space). Then, into the chain 2 (corner) space, Beg DC, chain 2, 3 DC into chain 1 space (start of first corner); **3 HDC in next 3 stitches, SC into SC stitch, slip stitch into chain 2 space, chain 6, skip the next 4 DC, SC into the chain 2 space, SC into the next SC stitch, 3 HDC in next 3 stitches, make corner (3 DC, chain 2, 3 DC)** three times, 2 DC to complete first corner, join with a slip stitch to top of Beg DC. _24 DC, 28 HDC, 12 SC, 4 ch-6 spaces_ [64] [16 stitches + 1 space per side]

Round 5: Popcorn, chain 1, Popcorn (corner made); **3 SC in next 3 sts, 3 DC in next 3 sts, slip stitch into next stitch, 6 SC in chain 6 loop, slip stitch into next stitch, 3 DC in following 3 sts, HDC in next st, 3 SC in next 3 sts, make corner (Popcorn, chain 1, Popcorn)** three times, join with a slip stitch to first chain (corner). _24 DC, 4 HDC, 24 SC, 8 Popcorn, 4 ch-1 spaces _ [80] [20 stitches + 1 space per side]

Round 6: 3 SC in chain 1 space (but NOT in tops of popcorns); then, ignoring any slip stitch spaces (after stitches #9 and #15 on each side), SC in all stitches around, placing 3 SC in corners. After final SC, join with a slip stitch in the first SC. Cut yarn and finish off ends. _88 SC total _ [88] [22 stitches per side)]

Note: Avoid picking up the first DC stitch that is INSIDE (and to the left) of the corner loops when doing Round 5.

Suggestion: When using this square for making a blanket, it is recommended that it gets trimmed with a double crochet round, probably in a different color, and putting either 5 DC in each corner, or, 2 DC, chain 1, 2 DC in each corner.


Final Note: This square has not been test-crocheted except by the designer. The designer welcomes anyone who wishes to test-crochet it and to provide feedback. To do this, email at: ea_goodwin@hotmail.com. The square shown in the photo was crocheted with Knit Picks Mighty Stitch yarn (worsted weight) and using a 5.5 mm crochet hook. However, the square can be crocheted with any yarn and appropriate crochet hook to yarn being used.


Tuesday, July 18, 2017

Personal Pattern / Other Pattern

It has been a long time since I have posted.  It is not that I have been absent from knitting. In fact, it is the opposite.  I have been SO busy knitting (and crocheting) that I really have not had time to blog, other than my page reports on Ravelry.

However, I have two pieces of news today.  The first is that my pattern "Raifwear Chapter Eight Cowl" placed second in the Ottawa Knitting Guild's Knitting Challenge for 2017.  This pattern is NOT and will not ever be available to the public.  It is solely for myself.  However, what I can share with you is a photo of the project.


So, there it is, a photo of me wearing the cowl I designed.  For those who do not know, Raif Badawi is a prisoner of conscience in Saudi Arabia.  He wrote blogs and was imprisoned in Saudi Arabia for doing that.  I am one of his supporters. #FreeRaif

My second piece of news is that I have available to those who are on Ravelry a written copy of Ursula Graf's Double Density Oven Mittens.  Ursula Graf produced a YouTube video illustrating how to make her oven mittens; however, apparently a written pattern has not been available.  I decided to rectify that and so, ONLY to those of you who are on Ravelry, you can obtain a copy of the pattern if you send me your email address. If you need me to give you my Ravelry name, then leave a note below and I will try to contact you somehow ... again, ONLY if you are on Ravelry.

Below is a photo of one set of Double Density Oven Mittens from the YouTube video of Ursula Graf's that I made.



Thanks for reading my blog. If there is anything you would like me to cover as a topic, please say so in the comments below.  Have a great day!



Friday, March 29, 2013

Tic-Tac-Toe Aran Square


Tic-Tac-Toe Aran Square

(to be used either alone or in combination

with other squares to make a Toddler's Play Mat)

Designed by: Anne Goodwin

(copyright March 29, 2013)

Tic-Tac-Toe Aran Square For Toddler's Playmat

Designed by: Anne Goodwin (copyright March 29, 2013)



Materials:



  • one ball of Mary Maxim Aran Irish Twist (205 yards/187 metres) OR any sturdy worsted weight acrylic yarn
  • 3.00 mm/US size 2 knitting needles, flat or circular are both fine
  • 2.5 mm/US size 1 knitting needles, shorter flat ones would be easiest to use
  • cable needle
  • stitch markers
  • D” crochet hook (to pick up and fix dropped stitches)(recommended)
  • large flat-tipped sewing/darning needle (to sew in yarn ends)



Ideally the square should be 12” x 12” inches. Please make adjustments to size of knitting needles that you use to obtain required gauge. (Simply knit a few rows of about 20 stitches to see how many stitches you get per inch.) If you would like your square to be larger, then use larger knitting needles. The pattern will work to any size knitting needle. In fact, if you would like this single square itself to be a playmat all by itself, then you would simply use very large knitting needles.



Terminology:



K – Knit

P – Purl

PM – Place marker

SM – Slip marker

1/1 RC (One by One Right Cross) – Slip one to cable needle, K1; K1 from cable needle

1/1 RPC (One by One Right Purl Cross) – Slip one to cable needle,hold to back, K1; P1 from cable needle

1/1 LPC (One by One Left Purl Cross) – Slip one to cable needle , hold in front, P1; K1 from cable needle

K1tbl – Knit one through back loop



Instructions For Making Large Square (the main piece)



On all wrong side rows, simply knit the knitted stitches and purl the purled stitches. The instructions for the rows make the design for the FRONT or the RIGHT SIDE of the piece. Therefore, when you are finished knitting the square, you will actually have knitted TWICE the number of rows as what are numerically listed below.



Using larger needles, cast on 84 stitches, using the cast-on method of your choice.



Knit 6 rows (3 ridges) of garter stitch. Now work the rows as follows, remembering to keep the 4 outside stitches at EACH edge as GARTER STITCH. I recommend you use markers in order to easily remember this. Now work the rows as follows:



  1. [K1,P2, K1, P1, K2, P1] eight times, K1, P2, K1.
  2. [1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 RPC, 1/1LPC] eight times, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  3. [P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K1, P2, K1] eight times, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  4. [1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC] eight times, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  5. P1, K2, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, K2, P1.
  6. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, PM, K 20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, PM, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.*
  7. K1, P2, K1, SM, K 20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, SM, K1, P2, K1.**
  8. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K 20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K 20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  9. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  10. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  11. P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K 20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  12. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K 20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  13. P1, K2, P1, K 20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, K2, P1.
  14. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  15. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  16. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  17. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  18. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K13, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  19. P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K6, K1tbl 48 times, K6, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  20. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K6, K1tbl 48 times, K6, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  21. P1, K2, P1, K6, K1tbl 48 times, K6, P1, K2, P1.
  22. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  23. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  24. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  25. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  26. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  27. P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  28. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.



You are, at this point, half-way through completing the square! Keep going!



  1. P1, K2, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, K2, P1.
  2. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  3. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  4. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  5. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  6. 1/1LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  7. P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  8. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K6, K1tbl 48 times, K6, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  9. P1, K2, P1, K6, K1tbl 48 times, K6, P1, K2, P1.
  10. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K6, K1tbl 48 times, K6, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  11. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  12. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  13. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  14. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  15. P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  16. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  17. P1, K2, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, K2, P1.
  18. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  19. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  20. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  21. K1, P2, K1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, K1, P2, K1.
  22. 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.
  23. P1, 1/1 RC, P1, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, P1, 1/1 RC, P1.
  24. 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, K20, K1tbl 3 times, K14, K1tbl 3 times, K20, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  25. [P1, K2, P1, K1, P2, K1] 8 times, P1 K2, P1.
  26. [1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC] eight times, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC.
  27. [K1, P2, K1, P1, 1/1 RC, P1] eight times, K1, P2, K1.
  28. [1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 RPC, 1/1 LPC] eight times, 1/1 LPC, 1/1 RPC.



Knit 6 rows (3 ridges) of garter stitch. Cast off comfortably, not too loose but not tightly.



* and ** setting up markers and explaining how to use them; instructions from here on in will not mention the markers; however, you should continue to use markers to separate the garter stitch border, the decorative border and the main piece.



Instructions for Making the 'X' and the 'O' Pieces (small squares to play the game)



I recommend that you knit the 'X' pieces in one color and the 'O' pieces in another color. This will be easier for a toddler to work with; also we are using flat pieces instead of smaller felted cut-outs of x's and o's because it is both easier to play with and SAFER!



To Make the 'X' piece:



Using smaller needles, cast on 16 stitches. Knit 3 rows garter stitch (1.5 ridges). Just as for the main piece, all wrong side rows, you must knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches. So, keeping 2 stitches at EACH edge apart (marked with a marker) for a garter stitch border, do the following:



  1. P2, K1, P6, K1, P1. (This and the following rows do not include instructions for the garter stitch border.)
  2. P3, K1, P4, K1, P3.
  3. P4, K1, P2, K1, P4.
  4. P5, K2, P5.
  5. P5, 1/1 RC, P5.
  6. P4, K1, P2, K1, P4.
  7. P3, K1, P4, K1, P3.
  8. P2, K1, P6, K1, P2.



Knit 3 rows (1.5 ridges) of garter stitch. Cast off comfortably.



To Make the 'O' piece:



Using smaller needles, cast on 16 stitches. Knit 3 rows garter stitch (1.5 ridges). Just as for the main piece, all wrong side rows, you must knit the knit stitches and purl the purl stitches. So, keeping 2 stitches at EACH edge apart (marked with a marker) for a garter stitch border, do the following:



  1. P5, K2, P5. (Again, this and following rows do not include instructions for garter stitch border.)
  2. P4, K1, P2, K1, P4.
  3. P3, K1, P4, K1, P3.
  4. P2, K1, P6, K1, P2.
  5. P2, K1, P6, K1, P2.
  6. P3, K1, P4, K1, P3.
  7. P4, K1, P2, K1, P4.
  8. P5, K2, P5.



Knit 3 rows (1.5 ridges) garter stitch. Cast off comfortably. Weave in all loose ends.



Make at least 5 of each of the 'X' and 'O' pieces.



Enjoy playing the game with your youngster!


Sunday, January 15, 2012

Wild Rose Textured Dishcloth

As of April 28, 2013 this pattern has had some errors fixed up.  Hopefully all is now perfect!

Wild Rose Textured Dishcloth

The wild rose is the provincial flower of the province of Alberta (Canada) and that is where I grew up.  This dishcloth pattern is dedicated to my mother, Marcella Schwenk, for showing me both how to 'smell the roses' and to 'do the dishes' when I lived out in Alberta.  Thanks Mom!










Yarn: Lily Sugar 'n Cream Cotton

Needles: Small, use size 4 mm for 9-inch square; Medium, use size 4.5 mm for 10-inch square; Large, use size 5 mm for 11-inch square

Cast on 45 stitches.

Rows 1 to 7: Knit across.

Row 8: K4, P37, K4.

Row 9: K23, P4, K18.

Row 10: K4, P14, K1, P3, K1, P18, K4.

Row 11: K13, P3, K5, P1, K5, P1, K17.

Row 12: K4, P13, K1, P5, K1, P3, K2, P2, K1, P9, K4.

Row 13: K12, P1, K5, P3, K7, P1, K16.

Row 14: K4, P11, K1, P8, K1, P7, K1, P8, K4.

Row 15: K12, P1, K6, P1, K9, P1, K15.

Row 16: K4, P10, K1, P10, K1, P7, K1, P7, K4.

Row 17: K11, P1, K6, P1, K12, P1, K13.

Row 18: K4, P8, K1, P13, K1, P6, K1, P7, K4.

Row 19: K10, P1, K7, P1, K14, P1, K11.

Row 20: K4, P6, K1, P16, K1, P6, K1, P6, K4.

Row 21: K9, P1, K7, P1, K16, P1, K10.

Row 22: K4, P5, K1, P1, K3, P13, K1, P7, K1, P5, K4.

Row 23: K8, P1, K8, P1, K10, P2, K5, P2, K8.

Row 24: K4, P4, K1, P8, K1, P9, K1, P9, K1, P3, K4.

Row 25: K7, P1, K10, P2, K6, P1, K8, P1, K9.

Row 26: K4, P5, K1, P9, K1, P3, K2, [P1, K1] twice, P8, K1, P3, K4.

Row 27: K6, P1, K8, P1, K1, P1, K4, P3, K10, P1, K9.

Row 28: K4, P5, K1, P10, K1, P9, K1, P7, K1, P2, K4.

Row 29: K6, P1, K7, P1, K9, P1, K11, P1, K8.

Row 30: K4, P4, K1, P11, K1, P10, K1, P6, K1, P2, K4.

Row 31: K6, P1, K6, P1, K11, P1, K10, P1, K8.

Row 32: K4, P3, K1, P11, K1, P11, K1, P6, K1, P2, K4.

Row 33: K6, P1, K6, [P1, K11] twice, P1, K7.

Row 34: K4, P2, K1, P12, K1, P10, K1, P6, K1, P3, K4.

Row 35: K7, P1, K5, P2, K9, P1, K13, P1, K6.

Row 36: K4, P2, K1, P11, K3, P9, K1, P1, K2, P2, K1, P4, K4.

Row 37: K8, P3, K4, P1, K8, P1, K2, P2, K9, P1, K6.

Row 38: K4, P2, K1, P8, K1, P5, [K1, P6] twice, K1, P5, K4.

Row 39: K8, P1, K7, P1, K5, P1, [K7, P1] twice, K6.

Row 40: K4, P3, K1, P5, K1, P9, K1, P3, K1, P8, K1, P4, K4.

Row 41: K8, P1, K9, P3, K11, P1, K4, P1, K7.

Row 42: K4, P4, K1, P2, K1, P13, K1, P11, K1, P3, K4.

Row 43: K7, P1, K10, P1, K14, P1, K1, P1, K9.

Row 44: K4, P6, K2, P14, K1, P11, K1, P2, K4.

Row 45: K6, P1, K11, P1, K14, P1, K11.

Row 46: K4, P8, K1, P13, K1, P10, K1, P3, K4.

Row 47: K7, P1, K10, P1, K13, P1, K12.

Row 48: K4, P7, K1, P14, K1, P10, K1, P3, K4.

Row 49: K7, P1, K11, P1, K13, P1, K11.

Row 50: K4, P7, K1, P13, K1, P11, K1, P3, K4.

Row 51: K7, P1, K11, P1, K12, P1, K12.

Row 52: K4, P8, K1, P12, K1, P11, K1, P3, K4.

Row 53: K8, P1, K10, P2, K10, P1, K13.

Row 54: K4, P10, K1, P8, K1, P2, K1, P6, K4, P4, K4.

Row 55: K12, P2, [K3, P1] twice, K7, P1, K15.

Row 56: K4, P12, [K1, P5] twice, K3, P10, K4.

Row 57: K23, P1, K3, P1, K17.

Row 58: K4, P14, K3, P20, K4.

Row 59: Knit across.

Row 60: K4, P37, K4.

Rows 61 to 66: Knit across.

Cast Off.

This pattern can be used to make dishcloths for craft sales meant for charity. Please do not resell the pattern or use it for personal profit. It is copyrighted to me (Anne Goodwin), January 15, 2012.






Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Assembling Sweater Pieces


This is a hooded baby sweater where the hood is already attached. What is left are two sleeves, right front, left front and back to attach together in addition to hemming the bottom of the sweater and the bottoms of the sleeves. The first step in assembling the sweater is to BLOCK all the pieces. We do this by pinning the pieces and wetting them with a bit of water.





In this photo, I have taken the sweater outside in the sunshine and sprayed the pieces. It only takes about five minutes to dry in bright sunshine.










This photo shows where I am sewing an INVISIBLE SEAM. In order to do an invisible seam, you pick up the BAR between stitches on EACH side of the seam and then sew together.








This photo shows what NOT to do when making an invisible seam. You must pick up the BAR, not the side of the knitted stitch.







Here the sides of the sweater and also the side of one of the sleeves are completed, using invisible seaming.









This photo show the seaming is done all the way. The raglan sleeves were inserted and then sewn from the INSIDE.









Here is a photo that shows the HEMMING being done up.









Once the sweater is assembled, it needs to be blocked once again.









This is the finished sweater.

Thursday, January 6, 2011

Mending Knitted Socks With A Knitted Patch

Today I mended a pair of my hand-knit socks using a method recommended by a friend of mine from the Ottawa Knitting Guild. I will go through the stages to show how it is done. A warning, in advance, is that since this was my very first attempt please do not expect perfection! I was merely aiming to fix the soles of my socks where they had worn through.






As you can see the socks have holes in the soles. The left sock was mended roughly and had worn through again. The right sock was also mended roughly but still holding.


The first thing I did was to cut around the mending I had previously done. Then I inserted double-pointed knitting needles into the live stitches on the top and bottom of each 'square' hole that I had made. This was done to hold the live stitches in place for when I would later want to attach the patch to the holes.

I then did two things. First I crocheted a number of loops and then I knitted from the loops (provisional cast-on). I counted the live stitches and cast on that number plus an extra stitch or so on each side.

I also counted 'up' the number of rows on the sides of the holes in the socks, thereby learning the number of rows that would be required. To be on the safe side, I added 2 extra rows to each of the patches that I made. In the photo to the left here, you can see the provisional cast-on along with the patch that I made.

The next stage in the mending was to use kitchener stitch to attach the live stitches at each end of the patch to the live stitches at each end of the square holes in the socks. This requires a great deal of patience and concentration! In this photo, you can see that I have already attached one row of live stitches to each other and am about to begin doing the next row.
In the next photo, you can see that the top and bottom rows of live stitches are now completed. What remains to be done is to sew the sides and to tuck in the loose threads.

This photo shows the completed patch, completely knitted and sewen into where the holes were. Am I finished? Not quite. There is still one step (no pun intended!) left to do.

I turned the sock inside out in order to see how it looked from the inside. What I saw were some 'rough edges' that I felt needed 'pruning'. So I took my scissors and VERY CAREFULLY went around the 'rough edges' and trimmed these.
This completes my explanation of the process. I wondered if the socks would feel comfortable aftering this patching and they do. I hope this helps you if you ever find that you also have socks that need mending but you are not quite sure where to begin!

Thursday, July 29, 2010

Stitch and Pitch at Rogers Centre in Toronto 2010

Here are some photos from a lovely night away July 27-28, 2010 in Toronto. It was "Stitch & Pitch" night, this year's event hosted by The Purple Purl. I had a wonderful time watching the Toronto Blue Jays play the Balitimore Orioles and sitting in the stadium with other knitters and enjoying knittalk, sharing yarn and showing off what we were working on or had completed. I enjoyed meeting Stephanie Pearl-McPhee (who threw the opening pitch for the game). Before leaving Toronto, my two friends and I visited three yarn shops in Toronto and then happily headed home with fresh yarn and exhilerated spirits.



1. Stephanie Pearl-McPhee and myself.





2.
This is the bar at the Rogers Centre where we stayed. It directly looks over the baseball field and you can watch the live action!





3. My friends who I travelled with to Toronto.




4. & 5. Showing off finished projects. These were done by the knitters sitting behind me.





6. & 7. The game and the action. The Blue Jays beat the Baltimore Orioles 8 - 2.






8. The Purple Purl yarn shop, one of three yarn shops that we visited.